Photo 2 Sep 4 notes Say hello to men who hate NSA spying but blame women for being spied on
Sep. 1 2014
Over the weekend someone released hundreds of revealing photos of celebrities that appear to have been stolen from private storage. In response to this, a bunch of anonymous guys on the internet copied them and posted them all over the town square, because the internet is written in ink and if you are ever a victim once in your life the internet will remind you of it forever.
These men are the detritus of human society for whom the internet provides a warm blanket, so let’s remove the warm blanket for a minute.
It’s still not clear how the private photos were obtained, but there’s a good chance the victims were hacked — it’s happened before. The last time, a man named Christopher Chaney illegally accessed more than 50 email accounts to steal nude photos and was later rewarded with 10 years in prison. Now, the hunt is on for the latest perpetrator. One theory pegs at least one user of AnonIB for the hack, and 4chan thinks it has already identified the guy who did it. While that’s going on, people are looking for other things to blame, like iCloud and victims that didn’t use better passwords. In any event, there’s a small group of one or more people responsible for this heinous intrusion. But they’re not the only ones responsible for it.
Take some of the members of Reddit, for example. If you’re not familiar with Reddit, this is the best way I know how to describe it: it’s an “anything goes” online message board where the loudest voices belong to misogynistic trolls who value anonymity over decency. In reality, “anything goes” is a bit of hyperbole, since the site does have two major rules: no child porn, and no posting “personal information.” And because Reddit is a special place, its ban on posting personal information will protect you unless you happen to be an attractive woman that lots of people want to see naked.
At ground zero of Reddit’s celebrity nude leak, where, as you are reading this, an orgy of men are sharing and ogling and re-sharing and re-ogling, lies this placard:

DO NOT POST ANY INFORMATION, TRUE OR FALSE, ABOUT THE IDENTITY OF THE PERSON(S) LEAKING THESE PHOTOGRAPHS AND VIDEOS. IF YOU DO THAT YOU WILL BE BANNED FROM THIS SUBREDDIT.

If the hypocrisy of this dim herd is not bare enough for you, consider this: these people want to protect someone who stole and exposed the private nude photos of women because logically their actions are roughly equivalent to someone who leaks state secrets like illegal mass spying on American citizens. And it’s not just people on Reddit who share this perspective.
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Say hello to men who hate NSA spying but blame women for being spied on

Sep. 1 2014

Over the weekend someone released hundreds of revealing photos of celebrities that appear to have been stolen from private storage. In response to this, a bunch of anonymous guys on the internet copied them and posted them all over the town square, because the internet is written in ink and if you are ever a victim once in your life the internet will remind you of it forever.

These men are the detritus of human society for whom the internet provides a warm blanket, so let’s remove the warm blanket for a minute.

It’s still not clear how the private photos were obtained, but there’s a good chance the victims were hacked — it’s happened before. The last time, a man named Christopher Chaney illegally accessed more than 50 email accounts to steal nude photos and was later rewarded with 10 years in prison. Now, the hunt is on for the latest perpetrator. One theory pegs at least one user of AnonIB for the hack, and 4chan thinks it has already identified the guy who did it. While that’s going on, people are looking for other things to blame, like iCloud and victims that didn’t use better passwords. In any event, there’s a small group of one or more people responsible for this heinous intrusion. But they’re not the only ones responsible for it.

Take some of the members of Reddit, for example. If you’re not familiar with Reddit, this is the best way I know how to describe it: it’s an “anything goes” online message board where the loudest voices belong to misogynistic trolls who value anonymity over decency. In reality, “anything goes” is a bit of hyperbole, since the site does have two major rules: no child porn, and no posting “personal information.” And because Reddit is a special place, its ban on posting personal information will protect you unless you happen to be an attractive woman that lots of people want to see naked.

At ground zero of Reddit’s celebrity nude leak, where, as you are reading this, an orgy of men are sharing and ogling and re-sharing and re-ogling, lies this placard:

DO NOT POST ANY INFORMATION, TRUE OR FALSE, ABOUT THE IDENTITY OF THE PERSON(S) LEAKING THESE PHOTOGRAPHS AND VIDEOS. IF YOU DO THAT YOU WILL BE BANNED FROM THIS SUBREDDIT.

If the hypocrisy of this dim herd is not bare enough for you, consider this: these people want to protect someone who stole and exposed the private nude photos of women because logically their actions are roughly equivalent to someone who leaks state secrets like illegal mass spying on American citizens. And it’s not just people on Reddit who share this perspective.

Read More

Link 2 Sep 10 notes Gaza Residents Share Allegations of Abuse, Claim Israeli Soldiers Used Them as Human Shields»
Photo 1 Sep 23 notes Stingray Tracking Devices: Who’s Got Them?
Stingrays, also known as “cell site simulators” or “IMSI catchers,” are invasive cell phone surveillance devices that mimic cell phone towers and send out signals to trick cell phones in the area into transmitting their locations and identifying information. When used to track a suspect’s cell phone, they also gather information about the phones of countless bystanders who happen to be nearby.
Read More

Stingray Tracking Devices: Who’s Got Them?

Stingrays, also known as “cell site simulators” or “IMSI catchers,” are invasive cell phone surveillance devices that mimic cell phone towers and send out signals to trick cell phones in the area into transmitting their locations and identifying information. When used to track a suspect’s cell phone, they also gather information about the phones of countless bystanders who happen to be nearby.

Read More

Video 1 Sep 171 notes

Video Shows IDF Snipers Shooting Palestinian Children For Fun, But Facebook Won’t Let You Share It

Aug. 31 2014

Footage released on YouTube clearly shows Israeli soldiers firing live rounds at Palestinian children playing on a roof in Al Khalil, an area of Hebron in Occupied Palestine.  An important piece of evidence attesting to the brutality of Israeli occupation.  Yet, Facebook users have reported  that the social media platform is preventing them from sharing the video.

Four soldiers lay on their chests on a rooftop.  In the same shot, we see what appear to be two Palestinian children playing on a rooftop.  One of the soldiers takes aim and shoots one of the Palestinians on the roof, clearly hitting him in the thigh.

The soldiers then celebrate.  One imitates the flailing actions of the wounded Palestinian, while others shake the hand of the ‘successful’ sniper.

Facebook users attempting to share the video from the Scriptonite Daily Facebook page, reported being unable to share the video.

Read More

Video 1 Sep 42 notes

The Interests behind Taxing & Incarcerating Black Communities 

Aug. 31 2014

Professor john a. powell discusses how rural communities benefit economically from the transport of blacks to rural prisons, bringing jobs and population surges that affect their electoral college vote

Photo 1 Sep 109 notes Israel Announces Massive West Bank Land Grab
Aug. 31 2014
Israel announced on Sunday a land appropriation in the occupied West Bank that an anti-settlement group termed the biggest in 30 years, drawing Palestinian condemnation and a U.S. rebuke.
Some 400 hectares (988 acres) in the Etzion Jewish settlement bloc near Bethlehem were declared “state land, on the instructions of the political echelon” by the military-run Civil Administration.

"We urge the government of Israel to reverse this decision," a State Department official said in Washington, calling the move "counterproductive" to efforts to achieve a two-state solution between Israel and the Palestinians.
Israel Radio said the step was taken in response to the kidnapping and killing of three Jewish teens by Hamas militants in the area in June.
Tensions stoked by the incident quickly spread to Israel’s border with Gaza, which is controlled by Hamas, and the two sides engaged in a seven-week war that ended on Tuesday with an Egyptian-brokered ceasefire.
The notice published on Sunday by the Israeli military gave no reason for the land appropriation decision.
Peace Now, which opposes Israeli settlement activities in the West Bank, territory the Palestinians seek for a state, said the appropriation was meant to turn a site where 10 families now live adjacent to a Jewish seminary into a permanent settlement.
Construction of a major settlement at the location, known as “Gevaot”, has been mooted by Israel since 2000. Last year, the government invited bids for the building of 1,000 housing units at the site.
Peace Now said the land seizure was the largest announced by Israel in the West Bank since the 1980s and that anyone with ownership claims had 45 days to appeal. A local Palestinian mayor said Palestinians owned the tracts and harvested olive trees on them.
Israel has come under intense international criticism over its settlement activities, which most countries regard as illegal under international law and a major obstacle to the creation of a viable Palestinian state in any future peace deal.
Read More

Israel Announces Massive West Bank Land Grab

Aug. 31 2014

Israel announced on Sunday a land appropriation in the occupied West Bank that an anti-settlement group termed the biggest in 30 years, drawing Palestinian condemnation and a U.S. rebuke.

Some 400 hectares (988 acres) in the Etzion Jewish settlement bloc near Bethlehem were declared “state land, on the instructions of the political echelon” by the military-run Civil Administration.

"We urge the government of Israel to reverse this decision," a State Department official said in Washington, calling the move "counterproductive" to efforts to achieve a two-state solution between Israel and the Palestinians.

Israel Radio said the step was taken in response to the kidnapping and killing of three Jewish teens by Hamas militants in the area in June.

Tensions stoked by the incident quickly spread to Israel’s border with Gaza, which is controlled by Hamas, and the two sides engaged in a seven-week war that ended on Tuesday with an Egyptian-brokered ceasefire.

The notice published on Sunday by the Israeli military gave no reason for the land appropriation decision.

Peace Now, which opposes Israeli settlement activities in the West Bank, territory the Palestinians seek for a state, said the appropriation was meant to turn a site where 10 families now live adjacent to a Jewish seminary into a permanent settlement.

Construction of a major settlement at the location, known as “Gevaot”, has been mooted by Israel since 2000. Last year, the government invited bids for the building of 1,000 housing units at the site.

Peace Now said the land seizure was the largest announced by Israel in the West Bank since the 1980s and that anyone with ownership claims had 45 days to appeal. A local Palestinian mayor said Palestinians owned the tracts and harvested olive trees on them.

Israel has come under intense international criticism over its settlement activities, which most countries regard as illegal under international law and a major obstacle to the creation of a viable Palestinian state in any future peace deal.

Read More

Video 1 Sep 752 notes
Photo 1 Sep 319 notes descentintotyranny:

Snowden Says NSA Employees ‘Routinely’ Passed Around Naked Photos That Had Been Intercepted
July 18 2014
One of the repeated talking points by the NSA for years has been about how there are all these “strict controls” on who has access to data and how it’s used. We’ve seen pretty clear evidence that the NSA’s definition of “strict controls” (like so many NSA definitions of plain English words and phrases) is different than what most people consider “strict controls.” After all, it insisted for months that Snowden didn’t have any access to actual surveillance data… until it was revealed that he did. There were also all those cases of flagrant abuses of the NSA’s system that were revealed last fall. The NSA pretended this showed how good they were at catching anyone who abused the system, but the details suggested otherwise. Many of the “caught” abuses only came out years later when the people who abused the systems to spy on lovers and friends admitted to it during interviews.  Keith Alexander insisted that the NSA had “100% audibility” of the actions of their employees and they made sure that no one abused their powers:

 “The assumption is our people are just out there wheeling and dealing. Nothing could be further from the truth. We have tremendous oversight over these programs. We can audit the actions of our people 100%, and we do that,” he said.  Addressing the Black Hat convention in Las Vegas, an annual gathering for the information security industry, he gave a personal example: “I have four daughters. Can I go and intercept their emails? No. The technical limitations are in there.” Should anyone in the NSA try to circumvent that, in defiance of policy, they would be held accountable, he said: “There is 100% audibility.” 

Of course, that doesn’t explain why so many of the “LOVINT” cases only came out after people self-confessed many years later, rather than through any audits.  Meanwhile, in the latest Ed Snowden interview (done with the Guardian’s Alan Rusbridger), Snowden reveals that NSA employees routinely would share naked photos that had been intercepted:

 “You’ve got young enlisted guys, 18 to 22 years old,” Snowden said. “They’ve suddenly been thrust into a position of extraordinary responsibility where they now have access to all of your private records. In the course of their daily work they stumble across something that is completely unrelated to their work in any sort of necessary sense. For example, an intimate nude photo of someone in a sexually compromising position. But they’re extremely attractive.  “So what do they do? They turn around in their chair and show their co-worker. The co-worker says: ‘Hey that’s great. Send that to Bill down the way.’ And then Bill sends it to George and George sends it to Tom. And sooner or later this person’s whole life has been seen by all of these other people. It’s never reported. Nobody ever knows about it because the auditing of these systems is incredibly weak. The fact that your private images, records of your private lives, records of your intimate moments have been taken from your private communications stream from the intended recipient and given to the government without any specific authorization without any specific need is itself a violation of your rights. Why is that in a government database?”  Then Alan Rusbridger, The Guardian’s editor-in-chief, asked: “You saw instances of that happening?”  “Yeah,” Snowden responded.  “Numerous?”  “It’s routine enough, depending on the company that you keep, it could be more or less frequent. These are seen as the fringe benefits of surveillance positions.” 

Of course, none of this is really that new. Way back in 2008, you may recall, that it was revealed that NSA analysts were listening in on pillow talk phone calls between Americans overseas and loved ones back home… and sharing those recordings around the office:

 Not only were calls between Americans listened to and recorded on a regular basis, the “good parts” (i.e., phone sex) were sent around to other operators to listen to as well. One of the operators said that on a regular basis messages would be sent around with messages like: “Hey, check this out. There’s good phone sex or there’s some pillow talk, pull up this call, it’s really funny, go check it out.” 

That was revealed years before Snowden even worked for the NSA. It would appear that little has changed.

descentintotyranny:

Snowden Says NSA Employees ‘Routinely’ Passed Around Naked Photos That Had Been Intercepted

July 18 2014

One of the repeated talking points by the NSA for years has been about how there are all these “strict controls” on who has access to data and how it’s used. We’ve seen pretty clear evidence that the NSA’s definition of “strict controls” (like so many NSA definitions of plain English words and phrases) is different than what most people consider “strict controls.” After all, it insisted for months that Snowden didn’t have any access to actual surveillance data… until it was revealed that he did. There were also all those cases of flagrant abuses of the NSA’s system that were revealed last fall. The NSA pretended this showed how good they were at catching anyone who abused the system, but the details suggested otherwise. Many of the “caught” abuses only came out years later when the people who abused the systems to spy on lovers and friends admitted to it during interviews.

Keith Alexander insisted that the NSA had “100% audibility” of the actions of their employees and they made sure that no one abused their powers:

“The assumption is our people are just out there wheeling and dealing. Nothing could be further from the truth. We have tremendous oversight over these programs. We can audit the actions of our people 100%, and we do that,” he said.

Addressing the Black Hat convention in Las Vegas, an annual gathering for the information security industry, he gave a personal example: “I have four daughters. Can I go and intercept their emails? No. The technical limitations are in there.” Should anyone in the NSA try to circumvent that, in defiance of policy, they would be held accountable, he said: “There is 100% audibility.”

Of course, that doesn’t explain why so many of the “LOVINT” cases only came out after people self-confessed many years later, rather than through any audits.

Meanwhile, in the latest Ed Snowden interview (done with the Guardian’s Alan Rusbridger), Snowden reveals that NSA employees routinely would share naked photos that had been intercepted:

“You’ve got young enlisted guys, 18 to 22 years old,” Snowden said. “They’ve suddenly been thrust into a position of extraordinary responsibility where they now have access to all of your private records. In the course of their daily work they stumble across something that is completely unrelated to their work in any sort of necessary sense. For example, an intimate nude photo of someone in a sexually compromising position. But they’re extremely attractive.

“So what do they do? They turn around in their chair and show their co-worker. The co-worker says: ‘Hey that’s great. Send that to Bill down the way.’ And then Bill sends it to George and George sends it to Tom. And sooner or later this person’s whole life has been seen by all of these other people. It’s never reported. Nobody ever knows about it because the auditing of these systems is incredibly weak. The fact that your private images, records of your private lives, records of your intimate moments have been taken from your private communications stream from the intended recipient and given to the government without any specific authorization without any specific need is itself a violation of your rights. Why is that in a government database?”

Then Alan Rusbridger, The Guardian’s editor-in-chief, asked: “You saw instances of that happening?”

“Yeah,” Snowden responded.

“Numerous?”

“It’s routine enough, depending on the company that you keep, it could be more or less frequent. These are seen as the fringe benefits of surveillance positions.”

Of course, none of this is really that new. Way back in 2008, you may recall, that it was revealed that NSA analysts were listening in on pillow talk phone calls between Americans overseas and loved ones back home… and sharing those recordings around the office:

Not only were calls between Americans listened to and recorded on a regular basis, the “good parts” (i.e., phone sex) were sent around to other operators to listen to as well. One of the operators said that on a regular basis messages would be sent around with messages like: “Hey, check this out. There’s good phone sex or there’s some pillow talk, pull up this call, it’s really funny, go check it out.”

That was revealed years before Snowden even worked for the NSA. It would appear that little has changed.

Photo 1 Sep 33 notes If you click on Jennifer Lawrence’s naked pictures, you’re perpetuating her abuse  
Actors may offer their image to public consumption as their professional practice, but what they are not trading is their intimacy. To merely look is an act of sexual violation
Aug. 31 2014

The price of fame is always increased scrutiny, but for any celebrity who does venture out in public, mere scrutiny has now given way to ongoing surveillance. The need for privacy is not only a sacred place to work out who we are, what we do or how we think; it’s a psychological refuge from overwhelming public dissection necessary for anyone’s mental health, famous or not.
For those who have ever anxiously untagged a lurid photo of themselves splashed across Facebook, please, then, consider the insidious implications of the latest celebrity hacking scandal.
Actor Jennifer Lawrence, star of the Hunger Games franchise, is one of more than 100 celebrities who have learned overnight that even their own phones have been recruited to the surveillance against them. Over the past few hours, news outlets have run a story alleging a hacker has used a security leak within the cloud data storage system to access the private mobile phone data of numerous celebrities. The data the user is sharing on sites like 4Chan are intimate photographs of celebrities taken by or for their lovers. Lawrence’s representatives have confirmed that the photographs are real, as have Ariana Grande’s. Actor Mary Elizabeth Winstead took personally to Twitter admonish her violators: “To those of you looking at photos I took with my husband years ago in the privacy of our home, hope you feel great about yourselves.”
It’s not merely tawdry that the private sexual conversations of partners are now being disseminated like memes. Sharing these images is not the same as making a joke including characters such as Doge, Grumpy Cat and Sad Keanu. It’s an act of sexual violation, and it deserves the same social and legal punishment as meted out to stalkers and other sexual predators.
Violation it is, too, because whatever the medium of communication between lovers (whether it’s a telephone call, a text message or the sexual act itself), the conversation is private and to intrude upon it is sexual involvement that has occurred without consent, and it has the same resultant harms. That a mobile phone used to facilitate a lovers’ conversation can also be used as a means of mass communication is irrelevant, because mass communication was in no way agreed to by the lovers, who had every right to believe their security would not be compromised. Actors and other entertainers may certainly offer their image to public consumption as their professional practice, but what they are not trading is their intimacy.
There are suggestions that prosecution may result not only for the hacker of the photos, but for those who view and share them. Good. To excuse viewing the images just because they’re available is deplorable. It’s the equivalent of creepily hiding in a wardrobe because a conversation may be taking place you’d be interested, excited or turned on to overhear.

If you click on Jennifer Lawrence’s naked pictures, you’re perpetuating her abuse 

Actors may offer their image to public consumption as their professional practice, but what they are not trading is their intimacy. To merely look is an act of sexual violation

Aug. 31 2014

The price of fame is always increased scrutiny, but for any celebrity who does venture out in public, mere scrutiny has now given way to ongoing surveillance. The need for privacy is not only a sacred place to work out who we are, what we do or how we think; it’s a psychological refuge from overwhelming public dissection necessary for anyone’s mental health, famous or not.

For those who have ever anxiously untagged a lurid photo of themselves splashed across Facebook, please, then, consider the insidious implications of the latest celebrity hacking scandal.

Actor Jennifer Lawrence, star of the Hunger Games franchise, is one of more than 100 celebrities who have learned overnight that even their own phones have been recruited to the surveillance against them. Over the past few hours, news outlets have run a story alleging a hacker has used a security leak within the cloud data storage system to access the private mobile phone data of numerous celebrities. The data the user is sharing on sites like 4Chan are intimate photographs of celebrities taken by or for their lovers. Lawrence’s representatives have confirmed that the photographs are real, as have Ariana Grande’s. Actor Mary Elizabeth Winstead took personally to Twitter admonish her violators: “To those of you looking at photos I took with my husband years ago in the privacy of our home, hope you feel great about yourselves.”

It’s not merely tawdry that the private sexual conversations of partners are now being disseminated like memes. Sharing these images is not the same as making a joke including characters such as Doge, Grumpy Cat and Sad Keanu. It’s an act of sexual violation, and it deserves the same social and legal punishment as meted out to stalkers and other sexual predators.

Violation it is, too, because whatever the medium of communication between lovers (whether it’s a telephone call, a text message or the sexual act itself), the conversation is private and to intrude upon it is sexual involvement that has occurred without consent, and it has the same resultant harms. That a mobile phone used to facilitate a lovers’ conversation can also be used as a means of mass communication is irrelevant, because mass communication was in no way agreed to by the lovers, who had every right to believe their security would not be compromised. Actors and other entertainers may certainly offer their image to public consumption as their professional practice, but what they are not trading is their intimacy.

There are suggestions that prosecution may result not only for the hacker of the photos, but for those who view and share them. Good. To excuse viewing the images just because they’re available is deplorable. It’s the equivalent of creepily hiding in a wardrobe because a conversation may be taking place you’d be interested, excited or turned on to overhear.

Link 31 Aug 18 notes 'Guns Kept People Alive' During The Civil Rights Movement»

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